Guttman Faculty Scholarship-Spring 2018-Scholarly Publications, Research Grants, and Presentations

September 27, 2018 | Faculty, Fellowships, Grants, Publication, Research

In spring 2018, Guttman Community College faculty have published an impressive array of articles, books, and reports, received prestigious grants for their research and scholarship, and delivered important presentations at a variety of local, national, and international academic conferences and scholarly events.

PUBLICATIONS

Ryan W. Coughlan, Assistant Professor of Sociology, is the co-author of “Progressive Education in the 21st Century: The Enduring Influence of John Dewey,” published in the Journal of the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era. The article explores the ways progressive schooling practices persist a century after John Dewey introduced this approach. Dr. Coughlan also co-authored two reports on school segregation in New Jersey: “New Jersey’s Segregated Schools: Trends and Paths Forward,” released by the UCLA Civil Rights Project, and “The New Promise of School Integration and the Old Problem of Extreme Segregation: An Action Plan for New Jersey to Address Both,” issued by the Center for Diversity and Equality in Education. These two reports provided the foundational evidence used in Latino Action Network v. New Jersey, a lawsuit alleging unconstitutional levels of segregation in New Jersey’s schools.

Mary Gatta, Associate Professor of Sociology, authored the community report “Women, Economic Insecurity and Aging in the. Florida Sunshine” for the American Association of University Women, Florida. Dr. Gatta also wrote three opinion pieces based on her research, which focused on the persistence of gender- and age-based pay inequality: “Florida Must Act to Ensure Gender Pay Equity,” published in the Florida Times Union; “That Old Glass Ceiling Still Exists,” in the St. Augustine Record; and “Older Women’s Economic Security,” in the Sarasota Herald Tribune.

Dalvin Hill, Program Coordinator and Assistant Professor of Information Technology, and David Devine co-authored “Accomplishing Interconnectivity of Health Information Exchanges at the National and State Levels,” a peer-reviewed paper that aims to propose a solution to the lack of inter-connectivity between Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) across the United States. As a result, electronic health records can be more accessible to medical professionals.

Claire King, Assistant Professor Open Discipline with expertise in Experiential Education, authored “A Koan for Duality,” which was published in Writing as a Way of Staying Human in a Time That Isn’t, a collection edited by Guttman faculty Nate Mickelson. This essay offers a simple and integrative way of teaching the writing of narrative, grounded in the necessary and often beautiful complexity of concrete experience. Dr. King’s “Service-Learning as Power Analysis in the Humanities” was published in the Wiley International Handbook of Service Learning for Social Justice. The article details the critical practice of service-learning as an engaged, experiential pedagogy that impels students to interrogate power both in how Humanities courses are taught and in the implicit power assumptions they investigate when applying and testing key course concepts outside the classroom and in the community.

Meagan Lacy, Information Literacy Librarian, co-authored the e-book, Connecting Children with Classics, a reference designed to help librarians, teachers, and parents recommend titles to children. This book presents annotations of approximately 300 classic children’s novels and organizes titles by one of seven reader appeals identified by reading researcher Catherine Sheldrick Ross, such as books that provide comfort, books that provide courage, and books that provide models for identity. Through helping children personally connect with books, the authors intend to help spark and develop an early interest in reading.

Nate Mickelson, Assistant Professor of English, edited Writing as a Way of Staying Human in a Time that Isn’t, published by Vernon Press. The book features twelve essays by teacher-scholars from around the country that advocate for writing pedagogies that integrate skills practice with considerations of student and faculty well-being, social and emotional development, and social and institutional justice. The collection features essays by Guttman faculty Dan Collins and Claire King. Dr. Mickelson also published two articles. The first, “Writing Around Paterson: Critical Urban Poetics in Williams, Olson, and Ginsberg,” published in the Journal of Urban Cultural Studies, examines the circulation of influence among William Carlos Williams, Charles Olson, and Allen Ginsberg during the late 1940s. The article is an extract from the first chapter of Dr. Mickelson’s forthcoming book City Poems and American Urban Crisis, 1945-Present. The second article, “Cultivating Critical Reading: Using Creative Assignments to Promote Agency, Persistence, and Enjoyment,” which appeared in Transformative Dialogues, analyzes reading and writing assignments that engage student creativity, arguing that creative practice enhances skills development by disrupting unproductive habits and increasing student engagement.

Marla A. Sole, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, authored “Open-Ended Questions: A Critical Class Component” in Mathematics Teacher. Dr. Sole argues that because problem-solving strategy selection is an essential skill for mathematically literate students to master, open-ended questions, which require this critical first step, should be part of all teachers’ repertoire. In this article, Dr. Sole discusses the benefit of considering and connecting multiple problem-solving strategies and the challenges in assessing student solutions to open-ended questions. The article discusses how open-ended questions can give rise to non-routine solutions, enhancing problem-solving skills and challenging students with diverse abilities and styles of learning.

RESEARCH GRANTS

Shadisadat Ghaderi, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, received the PSC-CUNY Research Award of $3,500, in support of her primary field research on the matroid intersection conjecture. Dr. Ghaderi was awarded a travel grant from the Mathematical Science Research Institute (MSRI) to participate in the 2018 Infinite Possibilities Conference (IPC) in Washington, D.C. Her contribution focused on promoting, educating, encouraging, and supporting women of color interested in mathematics and statistics.

Jihyun Kim, Assistant Professor of Science, is the co-Principal Investigator, with Dr. Lawrence Pratt (Principal Investigator) from Medgar Evers College, in the development of a new biofuel from a mixture of brown grease and waste plastics. Drs. Kim and Pratt are the co-recipients of a National Science Foundation grant of $300,000, in support of their research for the next three years (#1802524). This research opportunity will encourage and increase the involvement of students from Guttman and Medgar Evers Community Colleges in collaborative inquiry, applied research, and the production of green diesel fuel.

David Monda, Instructor of Political Science, was awarded the 2018 American Political Science Association Minority Fellowship to conduct research on the construction of national identity in developing contexts, focusing on the Garifuna, an Afro-Belizean diaspora community in Belize.

Tashana S. Samuel, Assistant Professor of Psychology, was awarded two grants: a PSC-CUNY grant of $3,500, and a Guttman Innovation Grant of $7,500, with fellow Guttman faculty and co-PI Jared Warner, for research on using mindfulness and growth mindset theory as an intervention to reduce math anxiety in first-year community college students.  She was also selected as a fellow for the 2017-2018 CUNY Faculty Fellowship Publication Program, which provides mentorship support in executing research projects for publication.

PRESENTATIONS AT ACADEMIC CONFERENCES AND SCHOLARLY EVENTS

Kristina Baines, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, presented “Embodying Ecologies: Considering Healthy Lives through Persistence and Change” at the Joint Conference of the Society of Ethnobiology and the Society for Economic Botany in Madison, WI. This presentation shared results and framing for Dr. Baines’ new book, in progress, which outlines case studies of how indigenous Belizeans negotiate health and heritage in times of temporal, spatial, and environmental change. In addition, Dr. Baines presented “‘I Do It Like We Do It Back Home’: Heritage Practices and Health in New York City Immigrant Communities” at the Society for Applied Anthropology Meetings in Philadelphia, PA. The presentation shared early results from research conducted on health/heritage connections, which show that immigrant families equate traditional ecological practices, such as cooking traditional foods in social groups, with better well-being. This research will be continued as part of an NYC Department of Health project. Also at the Society for Applied Anthropology Meetings, Dr. Baines co-presented “Shifting Stereotypes in Your Environment: an Interactive Curriculum,” with Victoria Costa, Creative Director of Cool Anthropology. The presentation shared the results of #AnthroHack2018, an event during which anthropology professors and applied anthropological practitioners provided instruction and materials related to the Shifting Stereotypes interactive curriculum.

Ryan W. Coughlan, Assistant Professor of Sociology, conducted three presentations: “The New Promise of School Integration and the Old Problem of Extreme Segregation: An Action Plan for New Jersey to Address Both” at the Beyond Desegregation conference at Harvard University; “White Isolation in Our Public Schools,” at the Education Reform, Communities, and Social Justice conference at Rutgers University; and “A Geospatial Analysis of Shifts in School and Neighborhood Demographics,” at the American Educational Association’s Annual Meeting in New York City.

Mary Gatta, Associate Professor of Sociology, co-authored the presentation“Seasonal Gentrification and Jobs on the Jersey Shore: Preliminary Findings from Asbury Park, New Jersey,” which was delivered at the American Sociology Association Meetings in Philadelphia, PA, by co-author and fellow Guttman faculty Molly Vollman Makris. Dr. Gatta delivered six lectures by invitation: “Women Aging in Florida,” to the American Association of University Women (AAUW) – St Augustine, FL; “The Year of the Woman: Have Far Have We Come?” to the AAUW – Daytona Beach, FL; “The Gendering of Jobs,” to the AAUW – Jacksonville, FL; “Women Aging in North Florida,” to the Women’s Giving Alliance in Jacksonville, FL; “Women, Aging and Economic Insecurity in Florida,” at the AAUW Florida State Convention in Sarasota, FL; and “Women and Economic Security,” at the AAUW’s Economic Security Forum in St. Augustine Florida.

Shadisadat Ghaderi, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, presented “The Matroid Intersection Conjecture for Singular Matroids” at the Joint Mathematics Meetings in San Diego, CA. This presentation was on the matroid intersection conjecture proposed by Nash-Williams in 1990. The presentation introduced a new methodology and techniques to approach the conjecture and showcased the results obtained from these techniques.

Meghan Gilbert-Hickey, Assistant Professor of English, presented “‘I’ve Connected with Them’: Racial Stereotyping and White Appropriation in the Chaos Walking Trilogy” at the Children’s Literature Association Conference in San Antonio, TX. In Chaos Walking, Patrick Ness problematizes the normalized heteropatriarchal family configuration while calling out the settler colonial mindset that undergirds this configuration. Dr. Gilbert-Hickey argues that as sympathetic as Ness’ portrayals of his indigenous characters and characters of color are, Chaos Walking is, at best, an incomplete critique of Western power imbalances and, at worst, an insidious investigation of normativity that privileges discussion of gender and sexuality at the expense of racial discourse.

Alexandra Hamlett presented “Ace in the Hole: Employing Active Learning Techniques to Revitalize Information Literacy Instruction and Improve Student Engagement” at the Librarians’ Information Literacy Annual Conference (LILAC) in Liverpool, England. Through a discussion of how active learning has influenced instructional design for information literacy instruction in Guttman’s innovative pedagogical model, the presentation explored applications of student-centered pedagogy for librarians from a practical lens and focused on strategies to infuse active learning into instruction sessions.

Dalvin Hill, Program Coordinator and Assistant Professor of Information Technology, delivered the presentation “Accomplishing Interconnectivity of Health Information Exchanges at the National and State Levels” at the 6th International Conference on Information Technology and Science in Bangkok, Thailand. The research presented aims to propose a solution for the lack of inter-connectivity between Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) across the United States. As a result, electronic health records can be made more accessible to medical professionals.

Jane Hindman, Professor of English, presented “Mentoring Each Other to Wholeness: A Brief Encounter with Formation Mentoring Communities” at Learning to Go High: Reawakening Hope Through Education, the Assembly for Expanded Perspectives on Learning Conference, in Estes Park, CO. Dr. Hindman also co-presented, with Guttman faculty Dan Collins and Nate Mickelson, “The Messy Business of Innovation: Community, Process, and Chaos in First-Year Writing” at the Critical Pedagogies at CUNY: Learning through Writing conference at LaGuardia Community College in New York City, and the Conference on College Composition and Communication in Kansas City, MO.

Charles Jordan, Assistant Professor, co-presented “Pathways to Higher Education Reform” to the American Educational Research Association (AERA) in New York City, with Matthew Goldstein, Lexa Logue, and Tony Picciano. The panel focused on the development and execution of CUNY’s Pathways Initiative and presented various perspectives on one of the university’s most controversial reforms. Dr. Jordan also co-presented “Pathways to Change: A Contemporary Analysis of Transfer Policy at the City University of New York” at the National Institute for the Study of Transfer Students (NISTS) in Atlanta, GA. Using a data analysis of the CUNY Pathways Initiative, the presenters reported that transfer outcomes underscored the importance of the shift in general education and degree credit policy.

Jihyun Kim, Assistant Professor of Science, presented “Engaging Non-Science Majors in Chemistry” at the 25th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education at the University of Notre Dame, IN. Dr. Kim presented her experiential learning assignments and inquiry-guided lab activities, which have been implemented in introductory chemistry courses.

Claire King, Assistant Professor Open Discipline with expertise in Experiential Education, presented “Not on a Pedestal: Educational Leadership Legacy of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.” at the St. James School Faculty In-Service Day in Basking Ridge, NJ. Dr. King led faculty and professional staff in a day-long workshop on servant-leadership and strategies in school, classroom, and community, reflecting on King’s courageous vision and human striving for equity, justice, and compassion. Dr. King co-presented, with Jonathan Hilsher and Laura Hill Rao, “Stories From the Trenches: How Four Public Institutions in New York Developed their Civic Action Plans” at the Campus Compact National Conference in Indianapolis, IN,. In this presentation, Dr. King offered a case study of challenges and successes in identifying potential community partners for Guttman’s CUNY Experiential Learning Opportunities. In addition, Dr. King presented “Service-Learning in the Classroom: An Experiential Learning Opportunity Workshop for BMCC Faculty” at the Center for Excellence in Teaching, Learning and Scholarship at the Borough of Manhattan Community College in New York City. Dr. King facilitated a day-long workshop for faculty with subsequent mentoring in critical, community-based service-learning in course design, community partner identification, implementation, reflection, and assessment of learning.

Rodrigo Lobo, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, co-presented “Setting Students Up to Succeed: How Collaborative Teaching and an Integrated Curriculum Fosters Engagement and Learning” at the 2018 Annual EDxED  NYC Professional Learning Conference in New York City with Guttman faculty Marla A. Sole and Tracy Daraviras, along with Diana Zechowski, Guttman Career Strategist, and Guttman students Thomas Jones, Sheuly Begum, and Angie Cordoba. This presentation focused on how faculty create an innovative, integrated, interdisciplinary curriculum and how this approach increases student engagement and success. Dr. Lobo also co-presented “Electronic Portfolios: A Framework for Archiving and Assessing Students’ Educational Growth” at the NYC Department of Education School Technology Summit, with Dr. Sole, Diana Zechowski, Thomas Jones, and Angie Cordoba. The talk traced the introduction of electronic portfolios to college students in their first semester and its use to archive their academic work through graduation.

Molly Vollman Makris, Program Coordinator and Assistant Professor of Urban Studies, presented “The Chimera of Choice: Gentrification, School Choice, and Community” at the American Educational Research Association Conference in New York City. Additionally, Dr. Makris presented “Seasonal Gentrification and Jobs on the Jersey Shore: Preliminary Findings from Asbury Park, NJ,” a peer-reviewed selection co-authored with Guttman faculty Mary Gatta, at the American Sociological Association Conference in Philadelphia, PA.

Nate Mickelson, Assistant Professor of English, delivered six scholarly presentations. Three presentations focused on writing pedagogy – at the Conference on College Composition and Communication in Kansas City, MO, and the Assembly for Expanded Perspectives on Learning in Estes Park, CO – and included a co-presentation at the Critical Pedagogies at CUNY: Learning through Writing conference in New York City with fellow Guttman faculty Dan Collins, JaneE Hindman, and three Guttman students. The presentations at the Northeast Modern Language Association in Pittsburgh, PA, and the Louisville Conference on Literature since 1900 in Louisville, KY, concentrated on American poetry and poetics. Dr. Mickelson also co-presented with Guttman Adjunct Lecturer Lydia Shestopalova at the 40th annual National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development (NISOD) International Conference on Teaching and Leadership Excellence in Austin, TX, highlighting the strengths and challenges of Guttman’s part-time faculty development series.

David Monda, Instructor of Political Science, presented “Competing Historical Memories in Sino-Japanese Foreign Relations: The Case of the Senkaku/Diao-yu-Tai Islands” at the CUNY Graduate Center, and “How Somali Piracy Exacerbates the Challenges of Refugee Policy in the Horn of Africa” at the Immigrant and Refugee Rights Conference at Baruch College in New York City. Prof. Monda also presented “Senegalese Entrepreneurs in America: The Case of ‘Little Senegal,’ New York” at the Eighth Toyin Falola Annual International Conference on Africa and the African Diaspora in Nairobi, Kenya.

Tashana S. Samuel, Assistant Professor of Psychology, and Guttman faculty Jared Warner, co-presented “Using Mindfulness and Growth Mindset Intervention to Reduce Math Anxiety” at the Lilly Conference: Designing Effective Teaching in Bethesda, MD. The research focuses on embedding psychological interventions in the classroom to alleviate math anxiety and increase self-efficacy in first-year community college students taking math courses.

Marla A. Sole, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, co-presented “Rethinking Mathematics Remediation: A Faculty-Led Project to Assess Placement, Redesign Curricula, and Streamline Mathematics Pathways” at the 2018 Annual Conference on Acceleration in Developmental Education in Washington, D.C. Dr. Sole shared the reforms Guttman faculty are implementing to decrease the time spent in mathematics remediation and to create pathways better aligned with student majors and career aspirations. At the Third Innovative Practices in Developmental Mathematics Conference in New York City, Dr. Sole presented “An Interdisciplinary Approach to Teaching Financial Literacy and Quantitative Reasoning Skills,” discussing how financial literacy is an issue of equity and how ideas from economics, ethics, and public policies can be integrated into teaching or refreshing elementary mathematics skills. In addition, Dr. Sole delivered three co-presentations in New York City: “Three CUNY Community Colleges Expand Accelerated Learning and Alternative Paths in Quantitative Courses,” at the Third Innovative Practices in Developmental Mathematics Conference, with Johannes Familton and A.J. Stachelek; “Portfolios: A Framework for Archiving and Assessing Students’ Educational Growth” at the NYC Department of Education School Technology Summit, with Guttman faculty Rodrigo Lobo, Guttman Career Strategist Diana Zechowski, and two Guttman students; as well as “Setting Students Up to Succeed: How Collaborative Teaching and an Integrated Curriculum Fosters Engagement and Learning,” at the 2018 Annual EDxED NYC Professional Learning Conference, with Guttman faculty Tracy Daraviras, Rodrigo Lobo, Diana Zechowski, and three Guttman students.