Requirements

The associate degree (A.A.) in Urban Studies requires the completion of 60 credits. Refer to course descriptions for information on pre-requisites and/or co-requisites.

College Requirements

  • Two (2) Writing Intensive courses
  • A minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA 

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CUNY Common Core Requirements (30 cr.)

  • BIOL 122: Introduction to Life & Environmental Science (3 cr.)
  • CHEM 110+: Introduction to Chemistry (3 cr.) or SOCI 231+: Introduction to Urban Community Health (3 cr.)
  • ENGL 103: Composition I (3 cr.)
  • ENGL 203^: Composition II (3 cr.)
  • LASC 101: City Seminar I (3 cr.)
  • LASC 102: City Seminar II (3 cr.)
  • LASC 200: The Arts in New York City (3 cr.)
  • MATH 103: Statistics (3 cr.)
  • SOSC 111: Ethnographies of Work I (3 cr.)
  • SOSC 113: Ethnographies of Work II (3 cr.)

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Urban Studies Course Requirements (27 cr.)

  • GOVT 201: Urban Politics: New York City Government (3 cr.) or GOVT 202: American Government and Politics (3 cr.)
  • GOVT 203: Introduction Urban Planning & Policy (3 cr.)
  • HIST 221: History of Urban Life (3 cr.)
  • SOCI 102: Introduction to Sociology (3 cr.)
  • SOCI 201*: Crime & Justice in Urban Society (3 cr.) or ANTH 227*: Sexuality & Gender in Urban Life (3 cr.)
  • UBST 102: Introduction to Urban Studies (3 cr.)
  • UBST 203: Race, Ethnicity & Community Development (3 cr.)
  • UBST 225: Global Urbanisms (3 cr.)
  • UBST 253^: Urban Research Seminar (3 cr.)

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Electives (3 cr.)

  • ECON 223: Economics of Social Issues (3 cr.)
  • ENGL 211: Cities in Film & Literature (3 cr.)
  • LASC 295: Issues in Global Learning (3 cr.)
  • MATH 120: College Algebra & Trigonometry (3 cr.)
  • MATH 201: Precalculus (3 cr.)
  • PHIL 201: Environmental Ethics (3 cr.)
  • SOCI 201*: Crime & Justice in Urban Society (3 cr.) or ANTH 227*: Sexuality & Gender in Urban Life (3 cr.)
  • SOCI 231+: Introduction to Urban Community Health (3 cr.)
  • UBST 204: Special Topics in Urban Studies (3 cr.)
  • UBST 298: Independent Study (1, 2, or 3 cr.)

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^Writing Intensive Course
*If you elect to take SOCI 201 to fulfill the Urban Studies Course Requirement, you may take ANTH 227 as an elective. If you elect to take ANTH 227 to fulfill the Urban Studies Course Requirement, you may take SOCI 201 as an elective.
+If you take CHEM 110 to fulfill your CUNY Common Core Scientific World, requirement you may take SOCI 231 as an elective.

Featured Course

UBST 203 (Credits: 3, Hours: 3)
Race, Ethnicity, and Community Development

In this course, students examine both the social construct of race and the realities of racial and ethnic inequalities throughout US history while tracing the development of racial and ethnic communities in the urban environment. Through assigned readings, multimedia content, and reflective writing, the course tackles the fundamental question of what is race and dissects the racial thinking and race-based practices in the United States. Special attention is paid to the nation’s history of immigration and citizenship as well as significant movements for racial justice, such as Civil Rights, Puerto Rican nationalism, and Black Lives Matter. Anti-Black racism, ​whiteness, Islamophobia, and Latinidad comprise some of the particular topics highlighted in materials and class discussions, in addition to the intersections of global politics and colonial legacies with race and racism.


Catalog Description

UBST 203 (Credits: 3, Hours: 3)
Race, Ethnicity, and Community Development

This course will explore the history and politics of community building with an emphasis on the relationship of race, ethnicity, and equity to the goals of citizen engagement and community planning. We will cover community development’s historical roots, as well as the contemporary thinking informing its current directions. In this course, students will gain experience evaluating community-based interventions and insight into the processes of working with diverse communities. Together we will examine case studies of community and social change projects organized by communities of color. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the sociopolitical context in which community development operates, explicitly addressing issues of structural racism and privilege.

Pre-/Co-requisites: None