Faculty Feature

  • Dr. Jihyun Kim, Assistant Professor of Science

    September 17, 2019Professor Ji Kim

    “Don’t bring a negative attitude [to what you’re doing] – you’ll be the one to lose out. Have a positive outlook!”

    It certainly takes a specialist to see potential in biowaste: an expert like Guttman’s Assistant Professor of Science Dr. Jihyun Kim, who has a Ph.D. in Organometallic Chemistry from Georgetown University and over 20 years of experience in research and teaching. In fact, she and Dr. Lawrence Pratt from Medgar Evers College, CUNY, were awarded a three-year National Science Foundation grant toward the development of a new biofuel from a mixture of brown grease and waste plastics. Student participants in the CUNY Research Scholar Program work under Dr. Kim’s guidance to transform brown grease – not cooking oil, she emphasizes – into biofuel.

  • Dr. Rodrigo Lobo, Assistant Professor of Business

    June 19, 2019Headshot of Rodrigo Lobo

    “Life is good, life is beautiful. Enjoy it. Use it to the full extent. Don’t waste your moments. Create an objective for you and go for it!” Assistant Professor of Business Dr. Rodrigo Lobo has been all about business for over 30 years. Before taking the daring “180 degrees toward full-time work in academia,” his career spanned the breadth of “corporate life.” For nearly a decade, Dr. Lobo contributed his analytical expertise to a unique public project: the Itaipu Binacional Company, an initiative of the Brazilian and Paraguayan governments that jointly runs one of the most productive hydroelectric power plants in the world.

  • Dr. April Burns, Assistant Professor of Psychology

    April 30, 2019April Burns

    Further affirming “solidarity” with her students, Dr. April Burns calls her trajectory to becoming Assistant Professor of Psychology at the College in 2016, “a winding path.” Her doctoral research in social psychology, completed at the CUNY Graduate Center under advisor and mentor Dr. Michelle Fine, focused on “the experience of upward mobility through education” and the impact of this experience on “first-generation graduates[,] their beliefs about justice and equity, education, merit, and… their interpersonal and family relationships.”

  • Marcia Edwards, Clinical Professor and Program Coordinator of Human Services

    April 4, 2019Marcia Edwards

    Initially piqued by the New Community College Concept Paper, Prof. Marcia Edwards, Clinical Professor and Program Coordinator of Human Services, was recruited to Guttman faculty for Fall 2013 to “develop the fieldwork component of the Human Services major.” Bringing her 30 years of social work practice and teaching to bear, Prof. Edwards has worked to align the required internship with the expectations of social work programs while teaching every Human Services course in the Catalog, along with Ethnographies of Work and several special courses; leading a Global Guttman group to Jamaica; and becoming Program Coordinator.

  • Dr. Shadisadat Ghaderi, Assistant Professor of Mathematics

    February 28, 2019Dr. Shadisadat Ghaderi

    “My first hope is that [my students] do not leave [my class] with math anxiety… that they see the application of what they learned in society, in practice.”

    Assistant Professor of Mathematics Dr. Shadisadat Ghaderi seamlessly combines the scholarly and abstract with the pedagogical and practical. With her Ph.D. in the combinatorics branch of pure mathematics, Dr. Ghaderi is working on what she calls “the most important open problem” in her field, the matroid intersection conjecture proposed in 1990.

  • Professor Derek Tesser, Lecturer of Science

    February 13, 2019Derek Tesser

    “Being unsure is not a sign of failure, or of weakness. It’s a sign of creativity. I encourage students to use that uncertainty as an opportunity to grow, to embrace that.”

    Guttman Instructor of Science and Ph.D candidate in the Earth and Environmental Science program at the CUNY Graduate Center Derek Tesser is no stranger to the elements of nature. For his dissertation, he is investigating “from an airborne perspective” and working to validate the operational hydrology models of New York City’s water supply – the vast system of reservoirs and aquifers that provides water for half of New York State’s population.

  • Dr. Laura Clarke, Assistant Professor of English

    January 2, 2019Laura Clarke

    “My favorite historical couple is Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Robert Browning and I plan on retracing their steps through Italy one day.”

    It is perhaps no surprise that Victorian scholar and Guttman Assistant Professor of English Dr. Laura Clarke named both of her children after literary figures. “I love books!” she exclaims with pride. Her own research focuses on the intersections between literature, philosophy, and the visual arts during the Victorian period. She is currently writing a book on the Victorian photographer Julia Margaret Cameron, who “took up photography when it was a relatively new medium and engaged in epistemological debates about what constituted art.” Dr. Clarke’s work in progress explores how Cameron’s “illustrations embody conversations with other literary works and how they represent her wider photographic theory.” More broadly, she has contributed articles to Victorian Poetry, Religion and Literature and Cleo: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History, as well as a book chapter to the edited collection Carlyle and the Idea.

  • Dr. Angelina Tallaj, Assistant Professor of Arts and Humanities

    November 5, 2018Angelina Tallaj

    Dr. Angelina Tallaj, Assistant Professor of Arts and Humanities and FYE Course Coordinator for Arts in New York City, dances in the classroom. A required first year course, Arts in NYC exposes students to the creative movements, artistic genres, and cultural institutions of the city. Anchored in Guttman’s unique  , this course includes and emphasizes the students’ own experiences. Their eyes light up, says Dr. Tallaj, “when I dance bachata and then teach how the steps reflect gender history. I love having my students dance because I want them to know that their bodies have histories and that those histories are legitimate.”