Requirements

Program Requirements

ENGL 103: Composition I (Credits: 3, Hours: 3)

Pre/Co-requisites: None

Composition I is a course in critical thinking, reading, and writing. It will provide a thorough introduction to the writing process and academic discourse: generating ideas, developing a thesis, supporting a thesis with evidence, and revising and editing. Students will be introduced to a variety of research resources, including the NYPL and CUNY library systems and learn basic research techniques. Because good writing starts with good reading, attention will be paid to critical reading strategies. The reading and writing assignments in Composition I will be coordinated with the City Seminar I theme.

Composition I satisfies three of six credits of the CUNY Pathways requirement in English Composition.

ENGL 103A: Composition IA (Credits: 0, Hours: 1.5)

Composition IA is a co-requisite support to ENGL 103: Composition I for students who enter the college non-proficient in reading/writing. This ninety-minute remedial companion course provides customized instruction that reinforces the reading and writing activities of ENGL 103: Composition I.

Co-requisites: ENGL 103

FYS 101: Learning about Being a Successful Student I (LaBSS I) (Credits: 0, Hours: 1.5)

Learning about Being a Successful Student I (LaBSS I) is a First Year Experience (FYE) requirement for all Guttman students. LaBSS I is the first of a two-course sequence designed to encourage reflection, exploration, and preparation related to professional development. Students will have the opportunity to increase ownership of their experience as undergraduates at Stella and Charles Guttman Community College, and continue to develop integrated academic and professional identities with the guidance of their Student Success Advocate. LaBSS I structures a culmination for the transition to college and empowers students to make informed decisions regarding personal growth, educational planning, and future professional pathways.

Pre/Co-requisites: None

FYS 102: Learning about Being a Successful Student II (LaBSS II) (Credits: 0, Hours: 1.5)

Learning about Being a Successful Student II (LaBSS II) is a First Year Experience (FYE) requirement for all Guttman students. LaBSS II is the second of a two-course sequence designed to encourage reflection, exploration, and preparation related to professional development. Students will have the opportunity to increase ownership of their experience as undergraduates at Stella and Charles Guttman Community College, and continue to develop integrated academic and professional identities with the guidance of their Student Success Advocate. LaBSS II structures a culmination for the transition to college and empowers students to make informed decisions regarding personal growth, educational planning, and future professional pathways.

Pre-requisites: FYS 101

LASC 101: City Seminar I (Credits: 3, Hours: 6)

City Seminar I emerges from the field of urban studies and takes a comparative, multidisciplinary approach to introduce students to complex issues such as sustainability, economic development, and social and environmental justice. Following a critical research model, the course challenges students to examine the historical, cultural, and social contexts of urban problems; to gather and analyze evidence from multiple stakeholders and perspectives; and to propose evidence-based solutions in written, oral, and digital media formats. While each offering of the course features a specific theme, every City Seminar I builds on students’ prior knowledge of the distinctive character, institutions, and socio-economic composition of New York City. To deepen students’ understanding of urban life, the City’s physical, social, environmental, and political realities are situated in relation to other urban centers. Through its emphasis on evaluating the unevenly distributed consequences of local, national, and international policies and practices, the course equips students with the skills to conduct thoughtful, critical analyses and to develop actionable proposals responsive to specific urban circumstances.

Pre/Co-requisites: None

LASC 101: City Seminar I satisfies the CUNY Pathways Flexible Common Core in World Cultures and Global Issues.​

LASC 102: City Seminar II (Credits: 3; Hours: 6)

City Seminar II introduces students to a variety of perspectives on the world as an interconnected global network of communities and cultures. In this course, students read and gather information from a range of sources, including published research, historical accounts, fiction, first person narratives, and research briefs to explore a range of perspectives on a topic of historical and contemporary importance to communities around the world. Students examine current and past issues related to housing, education, labor, human rights, and other issues related to the course topic, and analyze how they impact global communities. They will develop critical thinking skills by analyzing and synthesizing major themes and findings from research and readings and producing a research project by the end of the semester. While each offering of the course features a specific theme, every City Seminar II builds on students’ prior knowledge of the distinctive character, institutions, and socio-economic composition of New York City, as a global center. To deepen the understanding of national issues students developed in City Seminar I, this course situates the City’s physical, social, environmental, and political realities in relation to other global centers.

Pre/Co-requisites: None

LASC 102: City Seminar II satisfies the CUNY Pathways Flexible Common Core in U.S. Experience in Its Diversity.​

MATH 103: Statistics (Credits: 3, Hours: 5)

Pre/Co-requisites: Demonstration of Elementary Algebra proficiency

This course will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the fundamental concepts and computational methods of statistics. These concepts will be developed through the question of how to estimate an unknown quantity using sample data. Students will learn to incorporate the foundational concepts of mathematics with statistical analysis to describe and solve real-life problems and questions. Students will be taught to use estimation and precision and will learn the math study skills to assess and enhance their learning, their processes and their results. Students will use statistical software, graphing calculators, Microsoft Excel, MyMathLab and MyStatsLab to carry out a semester-long project involving data description and analysis. Students will work collaboratively and write using appropriate mathematical and non-mathematical language in order to successfully complete their project. The topics addressed include: displaying categorical data using tables, bar graphs, and circle graphs; drawing conclusions about categorical data; displaying quantitative data using dot plots, stem-and-leaf plots, histograms and box-and-whisker plots; describing data distributions using measures of center (mode, mean, and median) and measures of spread (standard deviation, range and IQR); displaying bivariate data using scatterplots; analyzing bivariate data using linear regression; elementary probability; normal probability distributions, sampling distributions; confidence intervals and hypothesis testing of the proportion and the mean.

MATH 103: Statistics satisfies the CUNY Pathways requirement in Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning.

MATH 103A: Statistics A (Credits: 1.5; Hours: 4.5)

With MATH 103B: Statistics B, a year-long version of MATH 103, offered in two sequential parts.

Pre/Co-requisites: None

This course will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the fundamental concepts and computational methods of statistics. These concepts will be developed through the question of how to estimate an unknown quantity using sample data. Students will learn to incorporate the foundational concepts of mathematics with statistical analysis to describe and solve real-life problems and questions.

Students will be taught to use estimation and precision and will learn the math study skills to assess and enhance their learning, their processes and their results. Students will use statistical software, graphing calculators, Microsoft Excel, MyMathLab and MyStatsLab to carry out a semester-long project involving data description and analysis. Students will work collaboratively and write using appropriate mathematical and non-mathematical language in order to successfully complete their project.

The topics addressed include: displaying categorical data using tables, bar graphs, and circle graphs; drawing conclusions about categorical data; displaying quantitative data using dot plots, stem-and-leaf plots, histograms and box-and-whisker plots; describing data distributions using measures of center (mode, mean, and median) and measures of spread (standard deviation, range and IQR); Displaying bivariate data using scatterplots; analyzing bivariate data using linear regression; elementary probability; normal probability distributions, sampling distributions; confidence intervals and hypothesis testing of the proportion and the mean.

Successful completion of MATH 103A and MATH 103B satisfies the CUNY Pathways requirement in Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning.

Note: All students earn 1.5 degree credits for MATH 103A and 3.5 developmental credits for financial aid purposes.

 

MATH 103B: Statistics B (Credits: 1.5, Hours: 4.5)

Pre-requisite: MATH 103A

This course will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the fundamental concepts and computational methods of statistics. These concepts will be developed through the question of how to estimate an unknown quantity using sample data. Students will learn to incorporate the foundational concepts of mathematics with statistical analysis to describe and solve real-life problems and questions. Students will be taught to use estimation and precision and will learn the math study skills to assess and enhance their learning, their processes and their results. Students will use statistical software, graphing calculators, Microsoft Excel, MyMathLab and MyStatsLab to carry out a semester-long project involving data description and analysis. Students will work collaboratively and write using appropriate mathematical and non-mathematical language in order to successfully complete their project. The topics addressed include: displaying categorical data using tables, bar graphs, and circle graphs; drawing conclusions about categorical data; displaying quantitative data using dot plots, stem-and-leaf plots, histograms and box-and-whisker plots; describing data distributions using measures of center (mode, mean, and median) and measures of spread (standard deviation, range and IQR); Displaying bivariate data using scatterplots; analyzing bivariate data using linear regression; elementary probability; normal probability distributions, sampling distributions; confidence intervals and hypothesis testing of the proportion and the mean.

Successful completion of MATH 103A and MATH 103B satisfies the CUNY Pathways requirement in Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning.

Note: All students earn 1.5 degree credits for MATH 103A and 3.5 developmental credits for financial aid purposes.

SOSC 111: Ethnographies of Work I (Credits: 3, Hours: 3 cr.)
Pre/Co-requisites: None
Ethnographies of Work I introduces students to sociological and anthropological perspectives on work as they investigate a range of careers. The course approaches work as a cultural system invested with meanings, norms, values, customs, behavioral expectations, and social hierarchies. Students pose key questions through the lens of ethnography in order to investigate workplaces, occupations, and career pathways in an urban context. Guided by the ethnographer’s assumption that there’s “always more than meets the eye,” students are encouraged to uncover myths and stereotypes about the work world and gain appreciation of how and why work matters to individuals in a range of occupations. Students explore dimensions of work life in the context of contemporary dynamics of disruption, uncertainty, innovation, and diversity, and draw connections between the self and work through readings, films, interviews, and fieldwork. The centerpiece of the course is for students to compose and present ethnographic accounts of workplace relations and vocational pathways as they contemplate their own career journeys.

SOSC 111: Ethnographies of Work I satisfies three credits in the Individual and Society area of the CUNY Flexible Core.

SOSC 113: Ethnographies of Work II (Credits: 3, Hours: 3 cr.)
Pre/Co-requisites: None
Ethnographies of Work II is the second course of a two-course sequence that uses social science concepts, perspectives, and methods to increase student understanding of the work world and the processes and contexts that link the self and work. The focus for the second semester is to conduct an ethnographic investigation on an occupation of interest to the student. Students will conduct fieldwork at a work site; they will use observation, interviewing, and artifact analysis as methods to learn to identify and reflect on personal, cultural, social, structural, and economic aspects of the work experience. Students will also research quantitative data on occupations and employment trends to better understand the depth of particular careers. Throughout the semester, students will add more in-depth ethnographic writings to their body of ethnographic works and continue to reflect on their own journey toward deciding on a career path.

SOSC 113: Ethnographies of Work II satisfies three credits in the Individual and Society area of the CUNY Flexible Core.

CUNY Common Core Requirements

To facilitate the transfer of credits between CUNY institutions, the University requires that 30 of the 60-credit Associate degrees are CUNY Common Core (“Pathways”) approved. We ensure that by the time a Guttman student completes the first-year curriculum, nearly all Pathways requirements are completed.

CUNY Common Core Requirements

(12 credits/4 courses)

Guttman Community College Common Core Requirement Course Options
(12 credits/4 courses)
English Composition (2 courses) ENGL 103: Composition I (3 cr.)

ENGL 203^: Composition II (3 cr.)

Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning (1 course) MATH 103: Statistics (3 cr.) OR
MATH 103A: Statistics A (1.5 cr.) AND MATH 103B: Statistics B (1.5 cr.) OR
MATH 120: College Algebra & Trigonometry (3 cr.)
Life and Physical Sciences (1 course) BIOL 122: Introduction to Life & Environmental Science (3 cr.) OR

BIOL 212*: Human Biology (STEM variant) (4 cr.)

*Some majors, such as Human Services, require a different Pathways-approved “STEM variant” course to satisfy the Life and Physical Sciences required core course.

 

CUNY Pathways Flexible Common Core

(18 credits/6 courses)

Guttman Pathways Flexible Common Core

(18 credits/6 courses)

World Cultures and Global Issues (1 course) LASC 101: City Seminar I (3 cr.)
U.S. Experience in Its Diversity (1 course) LASC 102: City Seminar II (3 cr.)
Creative Expression (1 course) LASC 200: The Arts in New York City (3 cr.)
Individual and Society (1 course) SOSC 111: Ethnographies of Work I (3 cr.)
Scientific World (1 course) CHEM 110*: Introduction to Chemistry (3 cr.) OR
SOCI 231*: Introduction to Urban Community Health (3 cr.)
One additional course from one of the above areas SOSC 113: Ethnographies of Work II (3 cr.)

 

^Writing Intensive Course

*Students may take either CHEM 110: Introduction to Chemistry or SOCI 231*: Introduction to Urban Community Health to fulfill the Scientific World CUNY Pathways Common Core. These courses may be taken during the Spring semester of the first year, as students advance toward their Program of Study, but they are not requirements of the FYE.