Center for Practice, Technology, and Innovation (CPTI)

CONTACT US

Nicola Blake, Founding Faculty & Dean of Faculty Affairs
Email: Nicola.Blake@guttman.cuny.edu
Phone: 646-313-8048
Location: 607-B

Bindi Patel, Deputy to the Dean of Student Engagement
Email: Bindi.Patel@guttman.cuny.edu
Phone: 646-313-8119
Location: 207-E

Christopher Roth, Assistant Director of Academic Technology
Email: Christopher.Roth@
guttman.cuny.edu

Phone: 646-313-8189
Location: 609-O

CPTI logo

Vision & Goals

The Center for Practice, Technology, and Innovation (CPTI) is a virtual space dedicated to supporting Guttman’s embedded approach to professional development (PD) for faculty and staff.

The purpose of the CPTI is to empower Guttman faculty and staff in the process of learning and implementing best practices to most effectively serve our student body and fulfill the college’s mission.

As innovative and unique as the College itself, the CPTI aims to:

  • provide a comprehensive structure for PD at Guttman
  • provide access to research-based practices related to student learning, active and engaged teaching, and learning-centered assessment
  • organize venues for staff and faculty to share, discuss, and assess innovative practices related to the achievement of academic and co-curricular goals and outcomes
  • complement and enhance live PD offerings with additional formats and materials in order to make content related to particular offerings and topics accessible to the college community
  • support the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
  • convene forums for collaboration among administrators, faculty, and staff

Offerings

Leadership

Nicola BlakeNicola Blake, Dean of Faculty Affairs, Chair of Professional Development Committee & Center Director

Nicola Blake Bio

Bindi PatelBindi Patel, Deputy to the Dean of Student Engagement, Co-Chair of Professional Development Committee

Bindi Patel Bio

Faculty Feature

  • Dr. Ria Banerjee, Associate Professor of English

    October 23, 2020Dr. Ria Banerjee

    “We can disagree and still be friends… Most of the time, a literature classroom is a philosophical space. It’s about how we live, how we react to each other, how we deal with love, and who we are constantly becoming. So, disagreement and argument… help us really understand what we think and why.”

    Associate Professor of English Dr. Ria Banerjee specializes in literary modernism, primarily Anglophone British, European, and Indian writing of the 1910s-1930s – “partly because I love that ‘modernist mood’ and partly because so much of what people lived through at the beginning of the 20th century bears eerie parallels to what we are going through now.” Presently, she is at work on the manuscript of her book, tentatively titled Drafty Houses, where she posits that the way “modernist [English] authors wrote about changing, renovating, and restructuring houses and personal spaces in fiction actually speaks to how they thought the UK ought to change politically.” Avoiding direct confrontation with the authorities, “established authors like T. S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf wrote about rooms, buildings, and houses as a kind of substitute for… the nation as a shelter for citizens.” These writers became what Dr. Banerjee calls “tepid activists,” who were “outraged at the many political atrocities carried out by the UK at home and abroad, especially in the British colonies, [but] tried to find ways to be critical without being arrested,“ or having their writing banned.