Academics

Academics

Welcome to Guttman Community College and your pathway to academic and student success. Here you will find information on academic programs, campus and university services, career development, student engagement programs, and faculty resources that support student and faculty success.

The title of “Provost” has a variety of historical and linguistic roots, but in essence, the Provost is the Chief Academic Officer, reporting to and acting as an extension of president. As the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, I oversee the work of deans of Academics Affairs and Student Engagement, as well as faculty coordinators of all academic programs and student support services. I work with the Senior Administrators of the college every day to ensure that we meet the needs of our faculty and students. Finally, I coordinate with Provosts from other colleges within The City University of New York (CUNY) to ensure that the university meets its goals and fulfills its mission.

The Offices of Academic Affairs (OAA) and Student Engagement will continue to update the resources available on these webpages as needed.  However, our team can be reached, if you have inquiries, comments or suggestions at provost@guttman.cuny.edu.

Once again, welcome and I thank you for your commitment to education and interest in Guttman Community College.

Howard Wach
Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost

  • Dr. Ria Banerjee, Associate Professor of English

    Dr. Ria Banerjee

    “We can disagree and still be friends… Most of the time, a literature classroom is a philosophical space. It’s about how we live, how we react to each other, how we deal with love, and who we are constantly becoming. So, disagreement and argument… help us really understand what we think and why.”

    Associate Professor of English Dr. Ria Banerjee specializes in literary modernism, primarily Anglophone British, European, and Indian writing of the 1910s-1930s – “partly because I love that ‘modernist mood’ and partly because so much of what people lived through at the beginning of the 20th century bears eerie parallels to what we are going through now.” Presently, she is at work on the manuscript of her book, tentatively titled Drafty Houses, where she posits that the way “modernist [English] authors wrote about changing, renovating, and restructuring houses and personal spaces in fiction actually speaks to how they thought the UK ought to change politically.” Avoiding direct confrontation with the authorities, “established authors like T. S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf wrote about rooms, buildings, and houses as a kind of substitute for… the nation as a shelter for citizens.” These writers became what Dr. Banerjee calls “tepid activists,” who were “outraged at the many political atrocities carried out by the UK at home and abroad, especially in the British colonies, [but] tried to find ways to be critical without being arrested,“ or having their writing banned. 

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Student Engagement Offices